More on Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common complaint.  The knee is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The knee joins the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). The smaller bone that runs alongside the tibia (fibula) and the kneecap (patella) are the other bones that make up the knee joint.

Tendons connect the knee bones to the leg muscles that move the knee joint. Ligaments join the knee bones together and provide stability to the knee:

  • The anterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding backward on the tibia (or the tibia sliding forward on the femur).
  • The posterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding forward on the tibia (or the tibia from sliding backward on the femur).
  • The medial and lateral collateral ligaments prevent the femur from sliding side to side.

Two C-shaped pieces of cartilage called the medial and lateral menisci act as shock absorbers between the femur and tibia.  Numerous bursae, or fluid-filled sacs, help the knee move smoothly.

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Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems. This article is an overview, since each of these conditions would require an entire article to cover.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee
  • Injuries

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. 
  • Torn meniscus. 
  • Knee bursitis. 
  • Patellar tendinitis. 
  • Mechanical problems

Mechanical Problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. 
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. 
  • Dislocated kneecap. 
  • Hip or foot pain. 

Arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. .
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. 
  • Gout. 
  • Pseudogout. 
  • Septic arthritis.  

Other problems

Chondromalacia patellae (patellofemoral pain syndrome) is a general term that refers to pain arising between your patella and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight misalignment of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Risk Factors for Knee Pain.

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Biomechanical problems. Certain structural abnormalities — such as having one leg shorter than the other, misaligned knees and even flat feet — can make you more prone to knee problems.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility are among the leading causes of knee injuries. Tight or weak muscles offer less support for your knee because they don’t absorb enough of the stress exerted on the joint.
  • Certain sports. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

See a doctor if

  • the pain is severe 
  • there is paralysis
  • there is numbness or constant pins and needles in the arms, hands, legs or feet
  • the area is swollen
  • a snapping sound or tearing sensation accompanied the injury
  • there is weakness of the injured body part
  • there is extreme limitation of movement or inability to use the injured area
  • there is malfunction of the bladder or bowel
  • there is associated nausea, vomiting or blurred vision 
  • the person is disoriented, dizzy or cannot perform normal activities because of the injury

 

As an afternote, I have a fun little story to relate:  A couple of years ago, a regular client came in for her regularly scheduled appointment on a day when Tuli (my Airedale Terrier) was with me at the office.  Tuli’s ‘degree’ is in detecting health problems.  Tuli immediately alerted on my client’s knee.  I ran a battery of tests to determine that, indeed, Tuli was correct, even though the client was feeling no pain.  I sent her to an orthopedist for an evaluation, which came back as a meniscus tear requiring surgery.  Following surgery and recovery, my client asked Tuli to recheck her knee.  She passed with flying colors!

Adding regular sessions of hands-on therapies to your healthcare routine before your body starts complaining will help to keep injuries at bay, improve your musculoskeletal health, and help you maintain a state of homeostasis (or the ability to maintain a stable environment in your body).  You can even request a body scan by Tuli!  And, don’t worry, Tuli is 100% hypoallergenic!

 

Treating Knee Pain with Bodywork Therapies

The formation of adhesive scar tissue in the tendons, ligaments and joints is often the primary culprit in long-term pain. Although muscles get injured most frequently, they also heal more easily. Tendons, ligaments and joints, on the other hand, often take months or years to heal and often stay injured for a lifetime.

An injury is present when there is tissue damage. The damage could manifest as a swelling in a bursa or a joint; pinching of a nerve or a tendon; micro-tears in a muscle, tendon, ligament or fascia; or a major disruption of tissue like a broken bone or a ruptured tendon. When there is an injury, a part of the body has lost its structural integrity and is broken in some way.

Knee pain

When musculo-skeletal structures are damaged or torn, the body’s wisdom ensures that the damage, whenever possible, will be repaired. However, to a large extent the degree and quality of this repair depend upon our own participation. The natural mechanisms of inflammation and wound healing are usually excessive for the job at hand. The body over-compensates when it responds to injury. More plasma, red and white cells, blood platelets and chemical mediators are released than are actually needed to allow full healing to occur. Therefore, additional scar tissue is likely to form. This scar tissue often binds together damaged and undamaged structures, resulting in adhesions that can lead to re-injury and to chronic pain.

There are several methods by which we can help the body limit the formation of adhesive scar tissue and/or recover from adhesions that have already formed. Friction and range of motion exercises allow healthy tissue to grow without the reformation of adhesions.  If the injured person is able to collaborate with the body’s healing processes by adequate physical movement, complete healing is more likely. If the person is unable to perform the required exercises by him or herself, it is important to have a therapist assist the person in a full range of motion of the injured part.

Even knee replacement surgery doesn’t guarantee complete knee pain relief. Before and after surgery, sufferers may notice stiffness, decreased mobility and other painful symptoms in their knees. Massage techniques can alleviate some of these symptoms and increase flexibility, both before and after knee replacement surgery.

Recovery after surgery

Knee replacement surgery recovery varies for everyone. The length of time it takes to recover from this jarring procedure depends upon many different factors, not the least of which is the type of surgery performed. New technologies provide lots of different knee replacement surgery options, and many physicians perform partial knee replacement surgeries that are less invasive than total replacement procedures. But even the most effective surgeries will not provide total and permanent knee pain relief, and ongoing therapy may be necessary for many sufferers.

Massaging the pain away

Massage techniques can help to provide knee pain relief when utilized on a regular basis to keep the new joint mobile, flexible and comfortable, and will compliment any other therapies you are receiving, such as physical therapy.

Yoga to help your knees heal

Years of compensation patterns coupled with the lack of proper stretching (and of course, neglecting the scar tissue) result in limitations of movement.

Many people engage in habitual physical activities that contribute to pain. The love for a sport may override the initial whisper of a pain, until that whisper becomes a scream.

When addressing any injury, it is valuable to also address the joints above and below. Nothing could be truer than with the knee. Opening and strengthening the hips in every direction is important for even distribution of weight. After just a few short sessions range of motion and functionality increases while pain decreases, and you may even choose to sit cross-legged!

One of my greatest rewards as both a Board Certified Bodywork Therapist and a Yoga instructor is assisting clients to keep their sport of choice in their lives by prepping their bodies with sport specific healing movements and self-care strategies.

Managing Stress in a Healthy Way

Stress affects all aspects of your life, including your emotions, behaviors, thinking ability and physical health. No part of the body is immune. But, because people handle stress differently, symptoms of stress can vary. Symptoms can be vague and may be the same as those caused by medical conditions.

Stress affects us all.  You may notice symptoms of stress when disciplining your kids, during busy times at work, when managing your finances, of when coping with a challenging relationship.  Stress is everywhere.  And while a little stress is OK (in fact some stress is actually beneficial), too much stress can wear you down and make you sick, both mentally and physically.

One of the greatest benefits of massage therapy is stress relief.  Humans have always been aware, it seems, of how detrimental unresolved stress can be.  Various herbs, aromatherapy, alcohol and drugs have been used throughout our history to ease the mental, emotional and physical stress that builds in the body, with touch therapy being the #1 choice throughout history.

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The first step to controlling stress is to know and recognize the symptoms of stress.  But recognizing stress symptoms may be harder than you think.  Most of us are so used to being stressed, we often don’t know we are stressed until we’re at the breaking point.

What is stress?

Stress is the body’s reaction to harmful situations – whether real or perceived.  When you feel threatened, a chemical reaction occurs in your body that allows you to act in a way to prevent injury.  This reaction is known as “fight or flight” or the stress response.  During stress response, your heart begins to race, breathing quickens, muscles tighten and blood pressure rises.  Your body is ready act.  This is how you protect yourself.

Stress means different things to different people.  What causes stress in one person may be of little concern to another.  Some people are better able to handle stress than others.  And, not all stress is bad.  In small doses, stress can help you accomplish tasks and prevent you from getting hurt.  For example, stress is what gets you to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting the car in front of you.  That’s a good thing.

Our bodies are designed to handle small doses of stress.  But, we are not equipped to handle long-term chronic stress without ill consequences.

Symptoms of Stress

Stress affects all aspects of your life, including your emotions, behaviors, thinking ability and physical health.  No part of the body is immune.  But, because people handle stress differently, symptoms of stress can vary.  Symptoms can be vague and may be the same as those caused by medical conditions.  You may experience any of the following:

Emotional symptoms of stress include:

·      Becoming easily agitated, frustrated and moody

·      Feeling overwhelmed, like you are losing control or need to take control

·      Having difficulty relaxing and quieting your mind

·      Feeling bad about yourself (low self-esteem), lonely, worthless and depressed

·      Avoiding others

Physical symptoms of stress include:

·      Low energy

·      Headaches

·      Upset stomach, including diarrhea, constipation and nausea

·      Aches, pains and tense muscles

·      Chest pain and rapid heartbeat

·      Insomnia

·      Frequent colds and infections

·      Loss of sexual desire and/or ability

·      Nervousness and shaking, ringing in the ear, cold or sweaty hands and feet

·      Dry mouth and difficulty swallowing

·      Clenched jaw and grinding teeth 

Cognitive symptoms of stress include:

·      Cognitive worrying

·      Racing thoughts

·      Forgetfulness and disorganization

·      Inability to focus

·      Poor judgment

·      Being pessimistic or seeing only the negative side 

Behavioral symptoms of stress include:

·      Changes in appetite – either not eating or eating too much

·      Procrastinating and avoiding responsibilities

·      Increased use of alcohol, drugs or cigarettes

·      Exhibiting more nervous behaviors, such as nail biting, fidgeting and pacing

 

Consequences of Long-Term Stress

A little stress every now and then is not something to be concerned about.  Ongoing, chronic stress, however, can cause or exacerbate many serious health problems, including: 

·      Mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety and personality disorders

·      Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, heart attacks and stroke

·      Obesity and other eating disorders

·      Menstrual problems

·      Sexual dysfunction, such as impotence and premature ejaculation in men and loss of sexual desire in both men and women

·      Skin and hair problems, such as acne, psoriasis and eczema and permanent hair loss

·      Gastrointestinal problems, such as GERD, gastritis, ulcerative colitis and irritable colon

Help is available 

Stress is part of life.  What matters most is how you handle it.  The best thing you can do to prevent stress overload and the health consequences that comes with it is to know your stress symptoms.

If you or a loved one is feeling overwhelmed by stress, it may be time to start a program of regular massage or arrange for a holistic health consultation to help you identify your triggers and symptoms.

Few experiences rival a full-body massage for pleasure and stress relief.  Word on the health benefits of massage therapy for stress relief has spread.  In 2006, 39 million Americans (one in six adults) had at least one massage, according to a nationwide survey by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA).  And, you’ll find the benefits of massage therapy for stress relief are only the beginning. 

“Americans are looking to massage for much more than just relaxation,” says Mary Beth Braun, President of the AMTA.  Massage therapy can be effective for a variety of conditions, including arthritis, back pain, insomnia, headaches, anxiety, circulatory problems, injury recovery, postural deviations and structural imbalances. 

Call me now at (619) 818-5397 to schedule your next massage now! 

Please note:  Massage is not a substitute for medical advice.  In times of extreme stress response, you may want your doctor to evaluate your symptoms to rule out other conditions.

Why Everyone Needs a Massage

Bodywork therapies can help correct the postural imbalances, nerve impingements, inflammation in the tissues and trigger points caused by overuse of these thechnological wonders, as well as reducing the symptoms caused by nerve compression due to improper posture. 

From smartphones to tablets to laptop computers, you can’t look anywhere today without seeing someone on one of these devices and sometimes more than one.  I constantly see the postural issues related to using these devices which will eventually cause pain.

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Narrow keyboards cause strain on the hands and wrists.  Improperly carrying a laptop can cause neck, shoulder and arm pain.  The manner in which smartphone and tablets are held can also cause problems.  In order to relieve strain in one area, you may be causing strain in another.  Placing the device at a good height to avoid neck strain, for instance, can mean straining the arms as they elevate a tablet or smartphone to eye level; but lowering the device to protect the arms can compromise the neck through excessive flexion.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome are two issues that people in an office setting may face and, with these conditions, come a variety of symptoms that massage therapy can help relieve – pain being but one.  “Pain, fatigue, weakness, and stiffness in the affected areas are the most common symptoms of these injuries,” explains Deborah Kimmit, a massage therapist and educator from Missoula, Montana.  “Numbness and tingling, as well as trigger point referrals are also common.”

Along with overuse, Kimmit also sees poor posture being the cause of painful conditions affecting the neck, shoulder and back.  “For example, a forward head posture can lead to neck pain as the person unconsciously reaches forward with the head to better see the screen,” she says.  Additionally, improper posture can sometimes be the result of other conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.  “Sometimes, improper posture occurs because the body is trying to find a comfortable position,” Kimmit says.

Bodywork therapies can help correct the postural imbalances, nerve impingements, inflammation in the tissues and trigger points caused by overuse of these thechnological wonders, as well as reducing the symptoms caused by nerve compression due to improper posture.  These imbalances are not limited to the neck, shoulder and arms, but are widespread throughout the pelvic girdle, abdomen, the low back, mid back and shoulder girdles as well as the arms, upper back and neck, sometimes even the legs will be involved.

Knowing which muscles to release, which to stimulate, and which to leave alone is key to correcting these postural imbalances.  

If you are having problems from overusing your computer, laptop, smartphone, tablet or even your gaming console, perhaps it’s time to schedule a session to find out what can be done to help you.  

Call now to schedule!  (619) 818-5397.

 

Preventing the Damaging Effects of Stress

Managing stress and overcoming its affects are critical for achieving and maintaining optimal health.  My mantra has always been:  Eat well, exercise properly and manage your stress for optimal health.

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Eat a well-rounded whole food diet full of fresh (preferably organic) fruits and vegetables, staying away from packaged, prepared and genetically modified foods, and drinking plenty of clean, filtered water.

Exercise for balance, as well as strength and cardio.  Our bodies and nervous systems were designed for movement.  Humans are unique in our ability to stand up and walk around on two legs.  In order to accomplish that, our spines curve in and out which allows us to balance in an upright stance.  Advances in technology, however, require many of us to sit far too much and use our bodies in ways that were never intended causing repetitive strain disorders and muscular imbalances which cause skeletal imbalances.  So, when you exercise, it’s important to balance the muscles used repetitively by focusing on their counterparts.  Or cross train.

Stress management is a huge subject, because the causes of stress are so complex.  Stress comes in many forms: physical, mental and emotional.  Physical stress can be caused by such things as poor diet, injuries and environmental factors such as smog.  Mental stress may come from your job, and emotional stress may come from relationships, or even a buildup of other types of stress in the body.  The important thing to remember is that the body itself does not differentiate between the various types of stress – all of it is handled in exactly the same way: stored in your tissues somewhere.

The first step to controlling stress is to know and recognize the symptoms of stress.  But recognizing stress symptoms may be harder than you think.  Most of us are so used to being stressed, we often don’t know we are stressed until we’re at the breaking point.

And, while a little stress every now and then is nothing to be concerned about, ongoing, chronic stress, can cause or exacerbate many serious health problems.

We all experience some form of stress in life.  Mental tensions, frustrations, and insecurity cause the most damage.  Hormones released by stress shrink the vessels inhibiting circulation.  A stressed mind and body means the heart works harder.  Breathing becomes rapid and shallow and digestion slows.  Nearly every bodily process is degraded.  Studies show stress can cause migraines, high blood pressure, depression, etc.  In fact, researchers estimate 80% or more of disease is stress related.

And yet, the antidote to stress is readily and easily available:  Massage Therapy.  Massage helps counteract the effects of stress.  Massage knows no age limits.  It works wonders on the young, the old and the in-between.  It can be especially helpful for the elderly experiencing the effects of aging which can include thinner and drier skin, reduced tissue elasticity, loss of mobility, slower nervous system response, decreased bone mass, sleeplessness, constipation, and a less efficient immune system.

Getting a massage does you a world of good.  Getting frequent massage does even more!  This is the beauty of bodywork.  Taking part in this form of regularly scheduled self-care can play a huge part in how healthy you’ll be and how youthful you’ll remain with each passing year.  Budgeting time and money for bodywork at consistent intervals is truly an investment in your health.  As a wise man has said “The best time to start taking care of yourself was 20 years ago, the second best time is now.”

How Hypertension Affects your Health

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is often called a “silent disease” because you usually don’t know that you have it. There may be no symptoms or signs. Nonetheless, it damages the body and eventually may cause problems like heart disease

hypertension

It’s important to regularly monitor your blood pressure, especially if yours has ever been high or above the “normal” range, or if you have a family history of hypertension. Because hypertension can cause heart disease, you may also need to be tested for heart disease.

Measuring Blood Pressure

You can get your blood pressure measured by a health care provider, at a pharmacy or you can purchase a blood pressure monitor for your home.

Blood pressure is measured in two ways: systolic and diastolic.

  • Systolic blood pressure is the pressure during a heartbeat.
  • Diastolic blood pressure is the pressure between heartbeats.

Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and is written systolic over diastolic (for example, 120/80 mm Hg, or “120 over 80”). According to the most recent guidelines, a normal blood pressure is less than 120/80 mm Hg. Pre-hypertension consists of blood pressure that is 120-139/80-89. Blood pressure that is 140/90 or greater is high blood pressure, or hypertension.

Blood pressure may increase or decrease, depending on your age, heart condition, emotions, activity, and the medications you take. One high reading does not mean you have the diagnosis of high blood pressure. It is necessary to measure your blood pressure at different times while resting comfortably for at least five minutes to find out your typical value.

In addition to measuring your blood pressure, you need to take into account your medical history (whether you’ve had heart problems before), assess your risk factors (whether you smoke, have high cholesterol, diabetes etc.), and your family history (whether any members of your family have had high blood pressure or heart disease).

If you suspect you have high blood pressure, you need to consult your doctor.  If heart disease is suspected, your doctor may recommend other tests, such as:

  • Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG): A test that measures the electrical activity, rate, and rhythm of your heartbeat via electrodes attached to your arms, legs, and chest. The results are recorded on graph paper.
  • Echocardiogram:   This is a test that uses ultrasound waves to provide pictures of the heart’s valves and chambers so the pumping action of the heart can be studied and measurement of the chambers and wall thickness of the heart can be made.
  • Cardiac stress test: During this test you may exercise on a stationary bicycle or treadmill to increase your heart rate while EKG readings are taken. A stress test can also be combined with an echocardiogram or nuclear medicine X-ray to get additional information.
  • Cardiac catheterization: A catheter, a small flexible tube, is inserted into the femoral artery in your groin or one of the arteries in your arm and guided to the coronary arteries. Your doctor can locate any blockages in the arteries and can also observe pressure and blood flow in the heart.
  • Ultrasound: High-frequency sound waves are used to look for blockages in blood vessels in the neck (carotid arteries) or other parts of your body.

Prevent Hypertension with Regular Massage

Stress reactions require major rerouting of blood throughout the body. This is largely controlled by the speed of the heart rate and the tightness or looseness of the various arteries (the tubes that carry blood away from the heart). So the cardiovascular system is particularly sensitive to changes when we’re under stress, and it suffers when that stress is prolonged.

There are many stress-related disorders of the cardiovascular system, and many of these problems are closely interrelated. In other words, having one cardiovascular problem can greatly increase your risk of having others.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a situation where the arteries are chronically tight, rather than flexible and elastic. Having them tighten down increases the force with which blood moves through them, just as squeezing your thumb over a garden hose increases the force with which the water moves through it. Long-term consequences of untreated high blood pressure are very serious; arteries become prone to damage (atherosclerosis), which will raise the risk of blood clots and heart attacks or stroke.

All of these are life-threatening problems that can be prevented or ameliorated by taking action to reduce stress in your life.  Daily exercise, regular massage therapy, and good nutrition contribute a great deal to lessening your stress while prolonging your life.  Swedish massage has been shown to reduce blood pressure, while sports massage and trigger point therapy raised blood pressure.

Staying Healthy Beyond Middle Age

My aunt always said “getting old ain’t for sissies!”.  She had a point.  By age 60, the average person has lost 30% of their muscle mass and chronic disease rates swell in middle age

Aging

My aunt always said “getting old ain’t for sissies!”.  She had a point.  By age 60, the average person has lost 30% of their muscle mass and chronic disease rates swell in middle age (after age 40):

  • Diabetes is the fastest growing disease in America
    • At the turn of the century, only 1% of the population contracted Type 2 Diabetes
    • Currently, 1 in 3 people will contract Type 2 Diabetes
  • Cancer rates continue to escalate
    • Estimated new cases in 2018 1,735,350
    • Cancer is one of the leading causes of death
    • Your risk of developing cancer is as high as 40%
  • Heart disease – the leading cause of death in America
    • 25% of all deaths in the United States are due to heart disease
  • Obesity
    • In California alone, 41% of students are overweight
    • 40% of American adults are considered obese
    • Obesity related health conditions include: diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, some cancers and physical inactivity

There are several factors common to chronic diseases, but the one that really stands out is stress.

Stress is fairly complex and includes physical, emotional/mental and environmental factors.  Perhaps the biggest contributor to stress today is diet.  When I was a child, our farm lands were healthy and our farmed foods were full of nutrition.  Not so much anymore.  When I was a child, we ate a whole food diet that was not genetically modified.  Not so much anymore.  Neither is it so easy these days to control your diet, especially if you eat out, even if you eat an organic whole food diet.

So, what’s the answer?  There is no easy answer today.  Control your weight, control your exposure to chemicals, control your body’s pH balance, control your diet – these will all contribute to your overall health, but won’t necessarily ensure that you won’t develop some sort of chronic disease.  Adding in appropriate exercise will further increase your health – but what’s appropriate?  That is a subject for another article!

But, the most important thing you can do is control your stress.  Add meditation, a Yoga, Tai Chi, or Qi Gong practice to your daily routine.  These will do more for you than pre-packaged “healthy” juices or smoothies.  Or, increase the frequency of your massage sessions.

One of the really nasty side effects of stress is that it accumulates in the body, tightening your muscles, reducing your immunity, raising your blood pressure, reducing your pain tolerance, interfering with your body’s ability to properly process what you eat, and disrupting your sleep.  This kind of stress accumulation doesn’t go away on it’s own.

The good news is that massage not only feels good, it’s good for you!  Just a few benefits of receiving regular massage range from reducing blood pressure and chronic pain to improved muscle tone and posture, improved skin tone, reduced anxiety, better recovery time, and improved sleep quality.  Massage should be a part of every person’s routine health maintenance plan.