Why Everyone Needs a Massage

Bodywork therapies can help correct the postural imbalances, nerve impingements, inflammation in the tissues and trigger points caused by overuse of these thechnological wonders, as well as reducing the symptoms caused by nerve compression due to improper posture. 

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From smartphones to tablets to laptop computers, you can’t look anywhere today without seeing someone on one of these devices and sometimes more than one.  I constantly see the postural issues related to using these devices which will eventually cause pain.

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Narrow keyboards cause strain on the hands and wrists.  Improperly carrying a laptop can cause neck, shoulder and arm pain.  The manner in which smartphone and tablets are held can also cause problems.  In order to relieve strain in one area, you may be causing strain in another.  Placing the device at a good height to avoid neck strain, for instance, can mean straining the arms as they elevate a tablet or smartphone to eye level; but lowering the device to protect the arms can compromise the neck through excessive flexion.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome are two issues that people in an office setting may face and, with these conditions, come a variety of symptoms that massage therapy can help relieve – pain being but one.  “Pain, fatigue, weakness, and stiffness in the affected areas are the most common symptoms of these injuries,” explains Deborah Kimmit, a massage therapist and educator from Missoula, Montana.  “Numbness and tingling, as well as trigger point referrals are also common.”

Along with overuse, Kimmit also sees poor posture being the cause of painful conditions affecting the neck, shoulder and back.  “For example, a forward head posture can lead to neck pain as the person unconsciously reaches forward with the head to better see the screen,” she says.  Additionally, improper posture can sometimes be the result of other conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.  “Sometimes, improper posture occurs because the body is trying to find a comfortable position,” Kimmit says.

Bodywork therapies can help correct the postural imbalances, nerve impingements, inflammation in the tissues and trigger points caused by overuse of these thechnological wonders, as well as reducing the symptoms caused by nerve compression due to improper posture.  These imbalances are not limited to the neck, shoulder and arms, but are widespread throughout the pelvic girdle, abdomen, the low back, mid back and shoulder girdles as well as the arms, upper back and neck, sometimes even the legs will be involved.

Knowing which muscles to release, which to stimulate, and which to leave alone is key to correcting these postural imbalances.  

If you are having problems from overusing your computer, laptop, smartphone, tablet or even your gaming console, perhaps it’s time to schedule a session to find out what can be done to help you.  

Call now to schedule!  (619) 818-5397.

 

Myoskeletal Alignment Therapy and Pain Desensitization

We’ve all seen how pain can reduce strength, flexibility, and endurance, as well as create a sense of fatigue. The brain is trying to do anything it can to avoid what it believes may cause injury. With a built-in adaptive mechanism, it can determine whether the body needs less or more protection at any given time.

In an environment that promotes relaxation under the guidance and reassurance of a qualified bodywork professional, I believe a client’s brain can be trained to associate slow, precise, graded-exposure stretching maneuvers with security instead of pain. Pain is essentially a threat warning, so pain exposure therapy (PET) requires time for the brain to process these bodily changes.

In the myoskeletal application of PET, therapists and clients use active feedback while working at the feather edge of the client’s painful barrier, just above comfort level. Muscle energy, fascial hook, and pin-and-twist maneuvers, encourage the client to engage the painful barrier with active movements and gradually push the discomfort level a bit further with each repetition. By progressively introducing stretch to areas that have been problematic in the past, the nervous system begins associating the new movement with safety instead of pain.

We’ve all seen how pain can reduce strength, flexibility, and endurance, as well as create a sense of fatigue. The brain is trying to do anything it can to avoid what it believes may cause injury. With a built-in adaptive mechanism, it can determine whether the body needs less or more protection at any given time. There is little doubt that traditional stretching routines produce an immediate increase in muscle extensibility due to the viscoelastic nature of muscle, but these effects quickly dissipate. The more permanent extensibility seen in PET is likely the result of two factors: the client’s willingness to tolerate the discomfort associated with stretch, and muscle, ligament, and joint pain gating.

According to the gate control theory, pain sensations are affected by descending modulatory influences from the brain, which can make the stretch either more or less sensitive to pain. When danger-signaling nociceptors are stimulated by excessive stretch, mechanical compression, and inflammation, the stimuli are fast-tracked to different parts of the brain. The brain then quickly interprets the information based on things such as prior therapeutic experiences, elevated mood, and confidence from positive expectations of stretch benefits. If performed correctly, afferent input from muscle and joint mechanoreceptors during a stretch can interfere with danger signals and inhibit an individual’s perception of pain.

Efficiency of movement and improved function are the desired outcomes of any bodywork strategy. Tension, trauma, and even overly aggressive bodywork can result in excessive soreness and stiffness, which compromises fluid movement. Such stiffness typically results from nonoptimal neuromuscular firing due to altered brain maps, rather than passive stiffness based on adhesions, scar tissue, or degenerative changes. Remember that the body’s physical and mental states interact bidirectionally, so we can decrease pain by moving better, and we can move better by decreasing pain.

A PET desensitization approach is aimed at normalizing sensation by providing consistent stimulus to the affected area for short periods of time. The brain will respond to this sensory input by acclimating to the sensation, thereby gradually decreasing the body’s pain response to the particular stimuli. Good clinical assessment and the appropriate application of PET, combined with self-care advice, can be successfully used in conjunction with other therapies to build an effective pain-management program.

Shoulder Pain

The muscle testing protocols I use allow me to unravel the musculoskeletal cause of dysfunction.

Many people suffer from shoulder pain, but, because the shoulder joint is the most complicated joint in the body, it can come from many different sources.  It’s important to get it diagnosed correctly.  Sometimes it’s from a rotator cuff tear, which may or may not need surgery.  Sometimes the long head of the bicep comes out of its groove, causing weakness and discomfort.  A frozen shoulder is quite common, with painful abduction and external rotation. Any of these can be the result of poor biomechanics and joint compression.  Most commonly shoulder pain is from poor posture and improper use.

A thorough assessment, both biomechanical and neurological, is necessary.  Since there is no one cause, there can be no one treatment.  While the muscle testing protocols I use allow me to unravel the musculoskeletal cause of dysfunction, treatment outcomes may be dependent on how willing the client is to do “homework” which is very specific for the individual.

Why is homework necessary?  Most postural problems develop over a lifetime.  So, while I can and most often do correct the deviation during one or a few sessions, in order for the brain, nerves and muscles to hold the corrections, the client must be involved in correcting his bad habits.  It’s that simple.  There is no magic wand.  The benefits of doing your homework far outweigh the disadvantages of not doing your homework, though.

Correcting your posture goes a long way to correcting pain syndromes you may have developed – shoulder pain, back pain, even foot and leg pain!

Call for your appointment today!

 

 

Scar Tissue Affects How Your Body Works

After releasing the scar tissue, I reset her pubus, rebalanced her muscles and watched her awe at being pain free in 8 years.

Last week, I wrote about how “little” injuries can affect your stress levels.  This week, is a twist on that theme.  But, before we start, let me take a moment to remind you that “stress” is not limited to emotional or mental stress, but includes physical stress.

Last week, I saw two clients presenting with dysfunction stemming from the scar tissue of having had c-sections.

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Client I:  Was referred from her chiropractor when adjustments failed to really impact her groin and leg pain.  Her medical doctor had diagnosed her with bulging lumbar discs, and everyone had assumed her pain was “sciatic” related.

Her intake had me questioning whether the disc problem was contributing to her pain, and I was right to do so.  By the time we were done discussing her medical history, I was convinced that much of her pain was due to scar tissue.  Consider for a moment where the incision is generally made for a “bikini” c-section.  Both of this client’s children were delivered by c-section.  Client I is a race-walker and has competed across the country in marathons and half-marathons.  She had to quit due to the pain she was experiencing in her groin and leg.

What I found was the scar tissue from two c-sections was impacting her obliques, medial hip rotators which rotate the hip toward the centerline, hamstrings and peroneals which both point the foot and flex the ankle, lift the outside of the foot and assist in preserving the arch.

Wondering how scar tissue in the lower abdomen could be affecting her lower leg?  Think of ripples in a pond.  I used to be fascinated as a child to watch the ripples in a pond grow after throwing in a pebble:  “When it first starts, you may not even notice how that “little” injury is affecting your stress levels, but over time if not properly dealt with, the effects of that “little” injury grow . . . and grow . . . and grow . . .  Before too long, that “little” injury turns into stress manufacturing pain.”

After releasing the scar tissue, I reset her pubus, rebalanced her muscles and watched her awe at being pain free in 8 years.

Client II:  Has been a massage client for several years.  A nurse, this client often discounts her discomfort as part of the aging process.  She never mentioned having had a c-section, regardless of the numerous intakes we’ve done over the years.  This week she had a new complaint which was a result of a new workstation.  But, it made me wonder . . .

After asking some very pointed questions, I discovered she had a c-section on delivery, and all the puzzle pieces fell into place for me.

The complaint she came in with was in her butt.  Her gluteus maximus, hip flexors, transverse abdominals and rectus abdominals all tested “off-line” or not functioning, while her obliques, gluteus medius and minimus were all taking up the slack of the non-functioning muscles.

After releasing the scar tissue the “off-line” muscles turned back on.  I released the obliques and glutes, then activated the abs, hip flexors and glute max and loved her reaction to feeling the best she ever has!

Both clients had the same underlying reason for their complaints, even though those complaints were very different.

Both clients must do their homework to maintain the improvement.

Is discomfort or pain part of aging?  It doesn’t have to be . . . But, that is a subject for another time.

The Pain Stress Cycle

When it first starts, you may not even notice how that “little” injury is affecting your stress levels, but over time if not properly dealt with, the effects of that “little” injury grow . . . and grow . . . and grow . . .  Before too long, that “little” injury turns into stress manufacturing pain.

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When it first starts, you may not even notice how that “little” injury is affecting your stress levels, but over time if not properly dealt with, the effects of that “little” injury grow . . . and grow . . . and grow . . .  Before too long, that “little” injury turns into stress manufacturing pain.

Chronic pain can limit your everyday activities, affecting how involved you are with friends and family members.  Unwanted feelings, such as frustration, resentment, and stress, are often a result. These feelings and emotions can worsen your pain.

The mind and body work together, they cannot be separated. The way your mind controls thoughts and attitudes affects the way your body controls pain.

Pain itself, and the fear of pain, can cause you to avoid both physical and social activities. Over time this leads to less physical strength and weaker social relationships. It can also cause further lack of functioning, reduced range of motion and pain.

Stress has both physical and emotional effects on our bodies. It can raise our blood pressure, increase our breathing rate and heart rate, and cause muscle tension. These things are hard on the body. They can lead to fatigue, sleeping problems, and changes in appetite.

If you feel tired but have a hard time falling asleep, you may have stress-related fatigue. Or you may notice that you can fall asleep, but you have a hard time staying asleep. These are all reasons to talk with your doctor about the physical effects stress is having on your body.

Stress can also lead to anxiety, depression, a dependence on others, or an unhealthy dependence on medicines.

Depression is very common among people who have chronic pain. Pain can cause depression or make existing depression worse. Depression can also worsen existing pain.

A family history of depression, increases the risk that you could develop depression from your chronic pain. Even mild depression can affect how well you can manage your pain and stay active.

Signs of depression include:

  • Frequent feelings of sadness, anger, worthlessness, or hopelessness
  • Less energy
  • Less interest in activities, or less pleasure from your activities
  • Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • Decreased or increased appetite that causes major weight loss or weight gain
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Thoughts about death, suicide, or hurting yourself

What’s the answer?  Get help.  The severity and length of your pain and dysfunction is the best indication of the direction you should take.  In mild cases of acute pain, massage therapy may be the quickest way to relief.  If your pain has moved into the chronic category, bodywork therapies may help – especially if your range of motion has been affected.  Other alternative therapies such as acupuncture and chiropractic may also help.  Seeing your doctor may also be appropriate.  I have yet to find a medical practitioner with x-ray vision – arranging for radiographic imaging may be appropriate and helpful.

The benefits of massage therapy include reducing/improving:

  • Anxiety
  • Digestive disorders
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia related to stress
  • Myofascial pain syndrome
  • Soft tissue strains or injuries

Moving up to bodywork therapies increases the benefits to also include improving:

  • Sports injuries
  • Joint pain

Moving up to Myoskeletal Alignment Therapy, increases the benefits to include:

  • Improving overall posture
  • Releasing joint restrictions
  • Returning to a normal, pain free life

Begin your path to wellness by making the call to schedule your session today!