Is Your Pain Due to Musculoskeletal Imbalances?

Another reason would be degeneration in the skeletal structure – as in degenerative disc disease.  The brain “stabilizes” the area by having the surrounding muscles brace the area.  This works really well short term; however, long term the results can be disastrous.

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Once a muscle(s) becomes dysfunctional, other muscles take over to compensate.  Of course, it doesn’t take too long before those secondary muscles become overworked, since they are doing double duty, then a third group of muscles begins compensating for the first two groups – and that pattern mushrooms.  Soon, instead of a really tired upper trap, the dysfunction runs from the head to the pelvic girdle or into the chest and down the arm.

musculoskeletal imbalances

Another reason would be degeneration in the skeletal structure – as in degenerative disc disease.  The brain “stabilizes” the area by having the surrounding muscles brace the area.  This works really well short term; however, long term the results can be disastrous.

Another common reason would be poor postural habits.  Picture a person slouching with the shoulders and head rolled forward.  In this case the muscles in the front part of the neck and chest shorten while the muscles in the back that hold the neck and head in proper alignment get stretched out and weak.  Or a person who sits most of the time – in this case, the hip flexors will become weak and can cause groin, leg and hip pain.

Common areas where dysfunctional patterns emerge are the shoulders, hips to knees and the low back.  But dysfunctional patterns can emerge anywhere in the body from the head to the toes.  

Why doesn’t massage address these dysfunctional patterns?  Massage therapies are systems of structured palpation or movement of the soft tissue of the body.  Massage does not address the brain/nervous system/movement relationship. 

I find it sad that we are so in our heads these days, we don’t feel these patterns developing.  It’s understandable if the cause is trauma – there’s not much we can do to prevent a motor vehicle collision, for instance – but we tend to ignore the early signs of dis-ease.  I have one client that ignored his back pain for 40 years!  I wish that were the exception, but it’s not.

Another client was recently referred to me who treated his long term back pain with western medicine, until that didn’t work anymore.  When he came to see me, he was a mess, and looking for the “magic wand”.  I developed a treatment plan and after just 4 sessions, he was pain free!

Don’t ignore what’s happening in your body.  When you feel pain, address it.  Pain is a request for change.  Believe me, I understand the draw of reaching for the bottle of ibuprofen or tylenol and sometimes that is just fine.  But if the symptoms keep coming back, it’s time to get help.  

Don’t let that nagging pain in your neck go for a long time.  One of my clients had poor posture throughout his lifetime.  Because he ignored his pain for so long, the body stabilized areas of dysfunction with bracing, which contracted the spine and eventually caused vertebra to fuse.  

Think of it this way:  If you’re changing the oil in your car more often than getting massage or bodywork, you are definitely taking care of the wrong vehicle.  After all, if you don’t care of your body, where will you live?

Pain is a Request for Change

Few things are as distressing as chronic pain.  It saps your energy and takes an emotional toll.  Over time, a vicious pain cycle develops, one that seems to have a life of it’s own, often persisting even after the original cause is resolved.

chronic pain

Our bodies were created to be self-healing dynamos, given the right tools.  But, often, we’re so distracted by life that we’re not paying the attention to our bodies that they deserve, and we don’t provide the tools our bodies need to avoid postural distortion and developing pain syndromes.

Amazingly, though, making just a few simple changes in your life will set you up to once again live a pain-free life.

Pain often develops with injury or illness.  Chronic pain develops when the complex interplay between the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System is upset.  Each element of pain – especially stress – can add to or even start the cycle.

The current medical model in this country advises that pain medications are considered the last line of defense in the increasingly common fight again chronic pain.  The most commonly prescribed medications for pain management are prescription grade anti-inflammatories, opioids and anti-seizure medications.  All have severe side effects, up to and including death, which often further degrade your quality of life. 

Manual therapies have been proven to be more effective tool in pain and stress management than medications.  It’s been in use since mankind’s beginning.  Haven’t you used mechanical pressure to relieve pain – stretching an aching back or rubbing an area that hurts?  Research shows that massage stimulates the release of natural pain-relievers such as endorphins and reduces the devastating grip of pain on your body.

When I first met George, he literally vibrated with tension and pain.  George suffered with a nerve entrapment causing pain that most days exceeded 10/10 and was nearly suicidal.  The traditional medical approach was to surgically sever the nerve (a short term answer at best as nerves regenerate over time) and physical therapy made his pain worse.  Working together and using a multi-dimensional approach, we were able to restore his life and lifestyle with pain levels which have maintained below 2/10 now for several years – a more than 80% reduction in pain!

Using the food you eat to support your body, instead of eating for dis-ease, will also help reduce pain levels by reducing inflammation.  Discover the foods you’re allergic or sensitive to, and correct the adverse affect those foods have on your system.  Eliminate the foods from your diet that contribute to dis-ease; eliminate and purge the effects of chemicals, heavy metals, pesticides and herbicides from your body.  Learn how to eat to balance your pH and to eat for health.

Christine’s case illustrates the dramatic effect diet can have on the body.  Christine suffers with arthritic degeneration of her spine, and came to me when her back pain ratcheted up to the 7-8/10 range and was interfering with her retirement lifestyle.  After a thorough assessment, it became clear that inflammation was a major contributor to her pain.  Just a few tweaks to her diet, and her inflammation was dramatically reduced, which brought her pain levels back to a manageable level (3/10 and below), allowing her preferred lifestyle to resume.

Our bodies were built to move, not sit behind a desk 40 hours a week, then behind the wheel of our car another 10 or more hours a week, sit to eat, sit to read, sit to watch television, sit to play games . . . The average American now sits 13 hours every day.  No wonder chronic pain is becoming epidemic!

I wish I could tell you that the simple solution is a certain number of hours at the gym 3 times per week, after all exercise is exercise, right?  I’m afraid not.  Once pain develops, you already have musculoskeletal imbalances, and it takes an expert to unravel the influences that contribute to those imbalances. 

A recent case study of mine really illustrates this truth:  Bob was referred to me when his back pain was so severe, he could no longer stand up straight or work.  Bob, a middle-aged “gym rat”, had unwittingly been continuing a work-out routine that was making his symptoms worse.  But, by using an approach of manual therapies combined with functional and corrective exercise, Bob could stand erect after just two sessions; after 8 sessions, he was balanced, pain free and back to work.  Before you hit the gym with pain, get properly diagnosed and have a plan to overcome the imbalances.

My clients know me as the go-to person when allopathic medicine fails.  When allopathic medical treatments fail, my clients come to me to help them devise a plan to address their complaints in a natural way, often without the need for medications or surgery.  It IS possible to unravel the unwanted influences on your body and regain your health.

Janet Lawlor is a holistic practitioner, Board Certified Bodywork Therapy, posture and pain specialist and a chronic pain survivor.  Janet is also a certified Yoga instructor and certified in Functional and Corrective Exercise.  She continues to train in techniques to help others overcome their chronic pain.  Her focus is on reducing pain, improving mobility and restoring quality of life.

The Symptoms and Risks of Hormonal Imbalance

It may feel as though you are simply tired or upset after an unusually stressful or busy week. With a hormonal imbalance, a person may suffer from anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite, and poor concentration. Irritability and mood swings are also quite common. Hormonal balance is critical for our emotional well-being, so radical changes in the way we feel about ourselves and interact with others may indicate a problem.

Because hormones affect so many different aspects of how our bodies operate, the outward symptoms tend to be varied and nonspecific. It may feel as though you are simply tired or upset after an unusually stressful or busy week. With a hormonal imbalance, a person may suffer from anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite, and poor concentration. Irritability and mood swings are also quite common. Hormonal balance is critical for our emotional well-being, so radical changes in the way we feel about ourselves and interact with others may indicate a problem.

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Some physical indicators of a possible hormonal imbalance include sudden weight gain, acne, hair loss, night sweats, and reduced libido. Women may experience intense premenstrual symptoms, vaginal dryness, yeast infections, and hot flashes. Some women also suffer from unusually heavy, irregular, or painful periods. Infertility may also be the result of a hormonal imbalance.

If a hormonal imbalance is suspected, blood, saliva, or urine tests can determine whether hormones are within a normal range.

Some of the risk factors associated with hormonal imbalance are emotional. Untreated hormonal imbalance can lead to intense anxiety, depression, and lethargy. Irritability, inability to concentrate, and mood swings may also take a significant emotional toll on both the patients and those around them.

There are also numerous physical risks associated with hormonal imbalance, the severity depending on which hormones are not at ideal levels and how long the imbalance is sustained. The dangers of insufficient insulin, for example, are well-documented in studies of diabetic patients. If insulin levels are not controlled, the blood sugar imbalance can lead to serious complications, including nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness.

The adrenal glands above the kidneys are divided into two structures that each produce different hormones, all involved in regulating essential body functions. The adrenal cortex synthesizes corticosteroid hormones, which help control metabolism, blood electrolyte levels, inflammation, stress response, and immune response. The other structure, the adrenal medulla, is the source of several hormones that communicate with the nervous system, including adrenaline, nor adrenaline, and dopamine. Adrenal hormone imbalance can result in depression, fatigue, dehydration, and susceptibility to infection.

In the case of hypothyroidism, where the thyroid is producing insufficient hormones, untreated patients may develop heart disease and high cholesterol. Pregnant women with hypothyroidism may have significant complications with their pregnancies, including premature labor, anemia, pre-eclampsia, and other conditions that may threaten the life of their baby.

As middle age approaches, women are at risk for hormonal imbalances associated with the onset of menopause. During this time, the ovaries cease to function, inducing an imbalance in estrogen and progesterone. Untreated, these imbalances put women at risk for osteoporosis, breast and uterine cancer, and heart disease.

Stress Kills

We’ve all heard it, it’s been all over the news lately, and the more science delves into the physiological reactions in our bodies, the more it’s realized that:  Stress does kill.

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It’s not really stress itself that does so much damage, it’s our response to stress.   For that reason, it is vitally important that in tough times you keep up whatever stress reduction programs work best for you, whether it’s running, Yoga, kickboxing, or getting regular massage sessions.

Times are tough right now.   Stress from money concerns is one of the biggest of all stressors and affects your relationships with family, co-workers and friends.

It’s not possible to cut all stress out of your life, and we don’t need to.   Stress, of itself, is not the bad guy; it’s our response to stress that can be so deadly.   Let’s examine what occurs in your body when it’s stressed out:

How Stress Affects the Brain

Stress creates excessive levels of cortisol in the brain, leading to the destruction of neurons, decreased short term and contextual memory and poor regulation of the hormonal response to stress.

How Stress Affects the Immune System

Stress affects the immune system by increasing sympthetic activity and decreasing cellular immunity.   Immune cells migrate to different parts of the body and can worsen autoimmune and allergic conditions.   Over time, this suppresses the body’s ability to fight off infection.

How Stress Affects the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Systems

The effects of stress can create significant damage to the cardiovascular system by increasing the risk of coronary artery disease, elevating blood pressure, increasing artherosclerosis (fat deposits in blood vessel walls), increasing the risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack), increasing the risk of diabetes and increasing the likelihood of obesity.

The Physiological Response to Stress

Seventy-five to ninety percent of all doctors visits are due to stress-related ailments and disorders.   Chronic stress leads to an out of balance biochemistry with elevated cortisol and suppressed serotonin.   The biochemical markers of stress in turn lead to ill health.   Stress plays a major causative role in both physical and mental health.

Stress has been linked to:

  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Breakdowns in the immune system
  • Alcohol and substance abuse
  • Cardiovascular disease

How Massage Helps

Some of the benefits of massage include

  • Stabilizing your nervous system
  • Decreasing pain
  • Reducing blood pressure
  • Decreasing anxiety and depression
  • Increasing your energy and endurance
  • Increasing your strength and resilience
  • Improving the functioning of your nervous system
  • Improving your body’s ability to detoxify
  • Improving sleep
  • Improving posture, range of motion and flexibility
  • Improving dexterity and fine motor skills
  • Improving balance
  • Improving attention span, concentration, memory, creativity and learning efficiency

Massage increases the oxygen levels in your brain, keeps your internal organs functioning their best and nurtures your skin, all of which helps to slow the aging process.

Stress sneaks up on all of us.  Before you know it, you’ve got tight muscles or reduced range of motion from muscle tension.  The most common reaction I get from my massage clients is “I feel like a new woman/man.  I had no idea all that was going on in my body.”  

Regular massage sessions will play a huge part  in how healthy you are, how healthy you’ll be and how youthful you’ll remain with each passing year.   Budgeting time and money for bodywork at consistent intervals is truly an investment in your health.  Massage is much more than feeling good for the moment.   The effects of massage are cumulative – the more often you receive massage, the more your health benefits.

Stress, Humor and Massage

Laugh

Have you ever noticed that when you lose your sense of humor, life becomes so much more difficult?  The element that most contributes to the loss of humor is stress.  Stress from relationships, stress from your job, stress from life.

In order to maintain balance in our lives and in our relationships, we need to maintain our humor.  My own first line of defense against loss of humor is a really good 90-minute stress-busting massage!

A healthy lifestyle is an essential companion to any stress reduction program.  You can enhance your general health and stress resistance by getting regular exercise, “eating the rainbow” and avoiding excessive alcohol, caffeine and tobacco.

Exercise in combination with stress management techniques is extremely important: as an effective distraction from stressful events, and by directly blunting the harmful effects of stress on blood pressure and protect the heart. 

Research shows that humor is a very effective mechanism for coping with acute stress.  Keeping a sense of humor during difficult situations is a common recommendation of stress management experts.  Laughter not only releases the tension of pent-up feelings and helps a person maintain perspective, but it also appears to have actual physical effects that reduce stress hormone levels.

Making a plan and do your best to execute it successfully.  But, when you feel your balance or sense of humor slipping, it’s time to get in for some table time.  If a stress-busting massage isn’t helping as much as you feel it should, it may be time to schedule a holistic health consultation where we’ll examine your diet, exercise, stress levels and stress management to create a plan to better serve you.

More on Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common complaint.  The knee is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The knee joins the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). The smaller bone that runs alongside the tibia (fibula) and the kneecap (patella) are the other bones that make up the knee joint.

Tendons connect the knee bones to the leg muscles that move the knee joint. Ligaments join the knee bones together and provide stability to the knee:

  • The anterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding backward on the tibia (or the tibia sliding forward on the femur).
  • The posterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding forward on the tibia (or the tibia from sliding backward on the femur).
  • The medial and lateral collateral ligaments prevent the femur from sliding side to side.

Two C-shaped pieces of cartilage called the medial and lateral menisci act as shock absorbers between the femur and tibia.  Numerous bursae, or fluid-filled sacs, help the knee move smoothly.

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Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems. This article is an overview, since each of these conditions would require an entire article to cover.

Symptoms

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee
  • Injuries

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. 
  • Torn meniscus. 
  • Knee bursitis. 
  • Patellar tendinitis. 
  • Mechanical problems

Mechanical Problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. 
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. 
  • Dislocated kneecap. 
  • Hip or foot pain. 

Arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. .
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. 
  • Gout. 
  • Pseudogout. 
  • Septic arthritis.  

Other problems

Chondromalacia patellae (patellofemoral pain syndrome) is a general term that refers to pain arising between your patella and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight misalignment of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Risk Factors for Knee Pain.

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Biomechanical problems. Certain structural abnormalities — such as having one leg shorter than the other, misaligned knees and even flat feet — can make you more prone to knee problems.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility are among the leading causes of knee injuries. Tight or weak muscles offer less support for your knee because they don’t absorb enough of the stress exerted on the joint.
  • Certain sports. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

See a doctor if

  • the pain is severe 
  • there is paralysis
  • there is numbness or constant pins and needles in the arms, hands, legs or feet
  • the area is swollen
  • a snapping sound or tearing sensation accompanied the injury
  • there is weakness of the injured body part
  • there is extreme limitation of movement or inability to use the injured area
  • there is malfunction of the bladder or bowel
  • there is associated nausea, vomiting or blurred vision 
  • the person is disoriented, dizzy or cannot perform normal activities because of the injury

 

As an afternote, I have a fun little story to relate:  A couple of years ago, a regular client came in for her regularly scheduled appointment on a day when Tuli (my Airedale Terrier) was with me at the office.  Tuli’s ‘degree’ is in detecting health problems.  Tuli immediately alerted on my client’s knee.  I ran a battery of tests to determine that, indeed, Tuli was correct, even though the client was feeling no pain.  I sent her to an orthopedist for an evaluation, which came back as a meniscus tear requiring surgery.  Following surgery and recovery, my client asked Tuli to recheck her knee.  She passed with flying colors!

Adding regular sessions of hands-on therapies to your healthcare routine before your body starts complaining will help to keep injuries at bay, improve your musculoskeletal health, and help you maintain a state of homeostasis (or the ability to maintain a stable environment in your body).  You can even request a body scan by Tuli!  And, don’t worry, Tuli is 100% hypoallergenic!

 

Treating Knee Pain with Bodywork Therapies

The formation of adhesive scar tissue in the tendons, ligaments and joints is often the primary culprit in long-term pain. Although muscles get injured most frequently, they also heal more easily. Tendons, ligaments and joints, on the other hand, often take months or years to heal and often stay injured for a lifetime.

An injury is present when there is tissue damage. The damage could manifest as a swelling in a bursa or a joint; pinching of a nerve or a tendon; micro-tears in a muscle, tendon, ligament or fascia; or a major disruption of tissue like a broken bone or a ruptured tendon. When there is an injury, a part of the body has lost its structural integrity and is broken in some way.

Knee pain

When musculo-skeletal structures are damaged or torn, the body’s wisdom ensures that the damage, whenever possible, will be repaired. However, to a large extent the degree and quality of this repair depend upon our own participation. The natural mechanisms of inflammation and wound healing are usually excessive for the job at hand. The body over-compensates when it responds to injury. More plasma, red and white cells, blood platelets and chemical mediators are released than are actually needed to allow full healing to occur. Therefore, additional scar tissue is likely to form. This scar tissue often binds together damaged and undamaged structures, resulting in adhesions that can lead to re-injury and to chronic pain.

There are several methods by which we can help the body limit the formation of adhesive scar tissue and/or recover from adhesions that have already formed. Friction and range of motion exercises allow healthy tissue to grow without the reformation of adhesions.  If the injured person is able to collaborate with the body’s healing processes by adequate physical movement, complete healing is more likely. If the person is unable to perform the required exercises by him or herself, it is important to have a therapist assist the person in a full range of motion of the injured part.

Even knee replacement surgery doesn’t guarantee complete knee pain relief. Before and after surgery, sufferers may notice stiffness, decreased mobility and other painful symptoms in their knees. Massage techniques can alleviate some of these symptoms and increase flexibility, both before and after knee replacement surgery.

Recovery after surgery

Knee replacement surgery recovery varies for everyone. The length of time it takes to recover from this jarring procedure depends upon many different factors, not the least of which is the type of surgery performed. New technologies provide lots of different knee replacement surgery options, and many physicians perform partial knee replacement surgeries that are less invasive than total replacement procedures. But even the most effective surgeries will not provide total and permanent knee pain relief, and ongoing therapy may be necessary for many sufferers.

Massaging the pain away

Massage techniques can help to provide knee pain relief when utilized on a regular basis to keep the new joint mobile, flexible and comfortable, and will compliment any other therapies you are receiving, such as physical therapy.

Yoga to help your knees heal

Years of compensation patterns coupled with the lack of proper stretching (and of course, neglecting the scar tissue) result in limitations of movement.

Many people engage in habitual physical activities that contribute to pain. The love for a sport may override the initial whisper of a pain, until that whisper becomes a scream.

When addressing any injury, it is valuable to also address the joints above and below. Nothing could be truer than with the knee. Opening and strengthening the hips in every direction is important for even distribution of weight. After just a few short sessions range of motion and functionality increases while pain decreases, and you may even choose to sit cross-legged!

One of my greatest rewards as both a Board Certified Bodywork Therapist and a Yoga instructor is assisting clients to keep their sport of choice in their lives by prepping their bodies with sport specific healing movements and self-care strategies.